Anonymous said: Hi! I was wondering if you knew if any YA novels with queer girls as the main character? I'm queer myself and am really intrigued by these books! :) thank you in advance!

Thanks for your question - I’m happy to say that there are many YA books featuring lesbian/bi/queer girls out there!

A few of my favorites are Adaptation and Ash by Malinda Lo, Ask the Passengers by A.S. King, Annie On My Mind by Nancy Garden and Skim by Mariko Tamaki and Jillian Tamaki. A few I haven’t read yet but have heard good things about are The Miseducation of Cameron Post by emily m. danforth, The Dark Wife by Sarah Diemer, If You Could Be Mine by Sara Farizan, The Second Mango by Shira Glassman, Everything Leads to You by Nina Lacour, and Fat Angie by e.E. Charlton-Trujillo. Julie Anne Peters has also written a lot of well-loved YA books about queer girls.

For even more, here’s Malinda Lo’s list of queer women in fiction recommendations and a huge lesbian YA fiction list from Good Lesbian Books.

Readers, you are welcome to reblog and add your favorites!

Anonymous said: Hi! I am Isis Asare, and I am looking for self-help books focused on queer women of color. Any recommendations?? Thank you, and great work on this Tumblr!!!

Hi Isis, thanks for reading!

Hmm, I don’t know a lot of about self-help books, so here’s my best attempt at a round-up. Some of these lean more towards memoir and activism/political essays, and some are more explicitly queer-inclusive than others, but I hope it’s a useful start!

As always, readers are encouraged to reblog and recommend!

I remember stapling my first book together out of notecards. I was four. It had recipes, stories, and fanciful racing cars—I suppose now it would be called a mixed-genre queer steampunk zine. Like many of you here I have always wanted to be a writer, and as I finished high school, I was thinking I might want to be an English major, to eventually be a writer—write books. So I told my parents, and I remember my father asking me to name a successful Asian-American writer at the time. That’s why I majored in chemistry.
Ryka Aoki in Why I Care Who Writes the Words that Touch My Heart, Delivered at the plenary panel “Story, Histories, Politics”  for the Writing Trans Genres conference, University of Winnipeg, May 23, 2014
This essay is included in the 2014 Tour Zine, available in print soon. Name your price and order this zine today here: http://topsidepress.com/tour/ (via topsidepress)

(via gynecomastodon)

fuckyeahlesbianliterature:

[image description: a photo of the book The Essential Dykes To Watch Out For Alison Bechdel. Next to it is a bowl of raspberries and a glass filled with a red drink and ice cubes]
meaganbambergerrr:

Spending my morning the best way I know how.

fuckyeahlesbianliterature:

[image description: a photo of the book The Essential Dykes To Watch Out For Alison Bechdel. Next to it is a bowl of raspberries and a glass filled with a red drink and ice cubes]

meaganbambergerrr:

Spending my morning the best way I know how.

Poetry is a political act because it involves telling the truth.
June Jordan, poet, essayist and activist. (via outontheshelves)

ATTN: TRANS WOMAN WRITERS WHO WANT TO GET PUBLISHED!

sandyfarquhar:

sandyfarquhar:

OPEN CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS: TRANS WOMEN ACROSS GENRES

THE DEADLINE IS ~~TOMORROW~~~

DEADLINE MOVED TO SEPTEMBER 6TH

EOAGH: A Journal of the Arts invites submissions for a special online issue dedicated exclusively to CREATIVE WRITING BY TRANS WOMEN, edited by Trace Peterson, co-editor of Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics.

We are looking for work from EVERY GENRE: Prose, Poetry, Poetics, Fiction, Nonfiction, Erotica, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Mystery, Fan Fiction, Memoir, Essay, Review, or anything else you can think of. Mixed-genre or multi-genre writing is welcome and encouraged.

How do we define “trans women”? You, if submitting writing for this project, should identify as such.

HOW TO SUBMIT: Deadline is Aug 30 September 6. Send 2-3 pieces from a genre of your choice to tracepeterson1@gmail.com

- http://eoagh.com/?page_id=2177

DO IT DO IT

trace is awesome and EOAGH is too! go go!

(PS. if you’re thinking about submitting but feeling shy or feel like your work needs another eye, i’d be happy to be that eye today.)

trace pushed back the deadline!

spectacularsam:

“I wanted to tell them that I’d never had a friend, not ever, not a real one. Until Dante. I wanted to tell them that I never knew that people like Dante existed in the world, people who looked at the stars, and knew the mysteries of water, and knew enough to know that birds belonged to the heavens and weren’t meant to be shot down from their graceful flights by mean and stupid boys. I wanted to tell them that he had changed my life and that I would never be the same, not ever. And that somehow it felt like it was Dante who had saved my life and not the other way around. I wanted to tell them that he was the first human being aside from my mother who had ever made me want to talk about the things that scared me. I wanted to tell them so many things and yet I didn’t have the words. So I just stupidly repeated myself. “Dante’s my friend.” ― Benjamin Alire Sáenz, Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

spectacularsam:

“I wanted to tell them that I’d never had a friend, not ever, not a real one. Until Dante. I wanted to tell them that I never knew that people like Dante existed in the world, people who looked at the stars, and knew the mysteries of water, and knew enough to know that birds belonged to the heavens and weren’t meant to be shot down from their graceful flights by mean and stupid boys. I wanted to tell them that he had changed my life and that I would never be the same, not ever. And that somehow it felt like it was Dante who had saved my life and not the other way around. I wanted to tell them that he was the first human being aside from my mother who had ever made me want to talk about the things that scared me. I wanted to tell them so many things and yet I didn’t have the words. So I just stupidly repeated myself. “Dante’s my friend.” 
― Benjamin Alire SáenzAristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

odofemi:

Jeanne Thornton’s The Black Emerald, freshly released on the new Instar Books (an imprint of OR Books), is one of the strangest things I’ve read in a long time. A collection of seven short stories and two novellas, this book really feels like it was written by someone who lives in a version of reality just slightly askew to our own. I devoured this book in just under twenty-four hours because I couldn’t put it down.
The closing novella, Myra’s Seven Conversations, has stuck in my mind as one of the best and strangest parts of the collection. It’s reminicent, to me, in some ways of Shirley Jackson’s We Have Always Lived in the Castle. And the opening titular novella brings to mind both Caitlín R. Kiernan’s work and Billy Martin’s (formerly, Poppy Z Brite) novel Drawing Blood, for an overall pulp comic Lovecraftian bizarreness that ends both mysteriously and abruptly. Both of these are worth the price of admission alone, but between them are seven very odd and humourous stories.
I highly recommend this for lovers of weird fiction, and for readers of trans fiction and queer fiction. You need to read this! Jeanne Thornton is worth reading an ebook for.
It’s available online for only $10 and worth every penny!

odofemi:

Jeanne Thornton’s The Black Emerald, freshly released on the new Instar Books (an imprint of OR Books), is one of the strangest things I’ve read in a long time. A collection of seven short stories and two novellas, this book really feels like it was written by someone who lives in a version of reality just slightly askew to our own. I devoured this book in just under twenty-four hours because I couldn’t put it down.

The closing novella, Myra’s Seven Conversations, has stuck in my mind as one of the best and strangest parts of the collection. It’s reminicent, to me, in some ways of Shirley Jackson’s We Have Always Lived in the Castle. And the opening titular novella brings to mind both Caitlín R. Kiernan’s work and Billy Martin’s (formerly, Poppy Z Brite) novel Drawing Blood, for an overall pulp comic Lovecraftian bizarreness that ends both mysteriously and abruptly. Both of these are worth the price of admission alone, but between them are seven very odd and humourous stories.

I highly recommend this for lovers of weird fiction, and for readers of trans fiction and queer fiction. You need to read this! Jeanne Thornton is worth reading an ebook for.

It’s available online for only $10 and worth every penny!

queer book club



In which a queer student of library science shares queer literary news, compiles LGBTQ booklists, and offers their thoughts about what they're reading (which is mostly YA).

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